Ceiling /

Ceilings - traditionally iconographic, thin, and continguous with the underside of the floor above – became exponentially thicker over the last 100 years. Ceilings acquired three dimensionality, consisting of a large inaccessible section used as storage space for HVAC, plumbing, wiring, surveillance...

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Detalles Bibliográficos
Autores principales: Di Robilant, Manfredo, Koolhaas, Rem, 1944-, Boom, Irma, 1960-
Formato: Otro (Other)
Idioma:Inglés (English)
Publicado: Venecia : Marsilio, 2014
Materias:
Acceso en línea:https://biblioteca.usat.edu.pe/cgi-bin/koha/opac-detail.pl?biblionumber=28337
Descripción
Sumario:Ceilings - traditionally iconographic, thin, and continguous with the underside of the floor above – became exponentially thicker over the last 100 years. Ceilings acquired three dimensionality, consisting of a large inaccessible section used as storage space for HVAC, plumbing, wiring, surveillance devices. The false ceiling is the sectional equivalent of poche – the cavity usually considered only in plan, in relation to walls. This hidden space has been declared offlimits to architecture – and to the imagination of the users of buildings – since the middle of the 20 th century. False ceilings are supposed to be meaningless but contain mysteries beyond their own suppressed, unconscious, icnography – of smoothness, comfort, control, convenience, even humanity. In the 21st century, a desire to erase the encrustations of modernism has led to a new dogma: The true ceiling, with protective paneling removed and the concrete slab and the entrails of the building left exposed. In some ceiling, thanks to BIM and sustainability engineering, these cumbersome systems begin to shrink, enabling the ceiling to become expressive again.